The Seven Denominations

The Federal Reserve Board currently issues $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100 notes.
Click on the notes below to learn more about their design and security features.

The $1 Note
Front of the $1 Note
Back of the $1 Note

The first $1 Federal Reserve note was issued in 1963, and its design—featuring President George Washington and the Great Seal of the United States—remains unchanged. Take a look at the $1 note and its security features.

The $2 Note
Front of the $2 Note
Back of the $2 Note

The back of the $2 Federal Reserve note features an engraving of John Trumbull's painting, “The Signing of the Declaration of Independence.” Although the original painting depicts 47 men, space constraints meant that only 42 could appear on the note. Take a look at the $2 note and its security features.

The $5 Note
Front of the $5 Note
Back of the $5 Note
The current-design $5 note entered circulation on March 13, 2008, and features subtle background colors of light purple and gray. The $5 note includes an embedded security thread that glows blue when illuminated by UV light. Two watermarks are featured in the $5 note, and they are visible from both sides of the note when held to light. Look for a vertical pattern of three numeral 5s to the left of the portrait and a large numeral 5 located in the blank space to the right of the portrait.  View an interactive version of the $5 note and its security features. Explore the security features of the $5 note's previous designs.
The $10 Note
Front of the $10 Note
Back of the $10 Note
The current design $10 note entered circulation on March 2, 2006, and features subtle background colors of orange, yellow, and red. The $10 note includes an embedded security thread that glows orange when illuminated by UV light. When held to light, a portrait watermark of Alexander Hamilton is visible from both sides of the note. In addition, the note includes a color-shifting numeral 10 in the lower right corner of the note. View an interactive version of the $10 note and its security features. Explore the security features of the $10 note's previous designs.
The $20 Note
Front of the $20 Note
Back of the $20 Note
The current design $20 note first entered circulation on October 9, 2003, and features subtle background colors of green and peach. The $20 note includes an embedded security thread that glows green when illuminated by UV light. When held to light, a portrait watermark of President Jackson is visible from both sides of the note. In addition, the note includes a color-shifting numeral 20 in the lower right corner of the note. View an interactive version of the $20 note and its security features. Explore the security features of the $20 note's previous designs.
The $50 Note
Front of the $50 Note
Back of the $50 Note
The current design $50 note first entered circulation on September 28, 2004 and features subtle background colors of blue and red. The $50 note includes an embedded security thread that glows yellow when illuminated by UV light. When held to light, a portrait watermark of President Grant is visible from both sides of the note. In addition, the note includes a color-shifting numeral 50 in the lower right corner of the note. View an interactive version of the $50 note and its security features. Explore the security features of the $50 note's previous designs.
The $100 Note
Front of the $100 Note
Back of the $100 Note
The current design $100 note is the latest denomination of U.S. currency to be redesigned, and it was issued on October 8, 2013. The current design $100 note features additional security features including a 3-D Security Ribbon and color-shifting Bell in the Inkwell. The $100 note also includes a portrait watermark of Benjamin Franklin that is visible from both sides of the note when held to light. View an interactive version of the $100 note and its security features. Explore the security features of the $100 note's previous designs.

All Circulating Denominations

Each note includes security and design features unique to how the denomination is used in circulation. The U.S. government periodically redesigns Federal Reserve notes to make them easier to use, but more difficult to counterfeit. It is U.S. government policy that all designs of U.S currency remain legal tender, regardless of when they were issued. This policy includes all denominations of Federal Reserve notes, from 1914 to the present.