$1 Note

1 dollar bill front
1 dollar bill back
1 dollar bill front
A
Raised Printing
intaglio printing

Move your finger along the note's surface to feel the raised printing, which gives genuine Federal Reserve notes their distinctive texture.

A
B
Paper
red and blue fibers

Federal Reserve note paper is one-fourth linen and three-fourths cotton, and contains red and blue security fibers. 

B
A
Raised Printing
intaglio printing

Move your finger along the note's surface to feel the raised printing, which gives genuine Federal Reserve notes their distinctive texture.

A
B
Paper
red and blue fibers

Federal Reserve note paper is one-fourth linen and three-fourths cotton, and contains red and blue security fibers. 

B
A
Raised Printing

Move your finger along the note's surface to feel the raised printing, which gives genuine Federal Reserve notes their distinctive texture.

intaglio printing
B
Paper

Federal Reserve note paper is one-fourth linen and three-fourths cotton, and contains red and blue security fibers. 

red and blue fibers
Federal Reserve Bank Seal
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston seal

A black seal to the left of the portrait bears the name and corresponding letter of the distributing Federal Reserve Bank.

Treasury Seal
green Treasury seal

A green seal to the right of the portrait represents the U.S. Department of the Treasury.  The design of the seal was changed to incorporate an English inscription and appears on all Federal Reserve notes of the 1969 series year or later. 

Portrait and Vignette
Washington's printed portrait

The $1 note features a portrait of George Washington on the front of the note and an image of the Great Seal of the United States on the back of the note.

Serial Numbers
a serial number

A combination of eleven numbers and letters appears twice on the front of the note.

The $1 Federal Reserve note was issued in 1963, and its design—featuring President George Washington and the Great Seal of the United States—remains unchanged.

George Washington

Downloads

Play Money Coloring Sheets

These printable coloring sheets of denominations $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, and $100 are intended for children, parents, and teachers.

$1 Note (1963-Present)

Explore security and design features of the $1 note, issued 1963-present.

History

1861

Demand Notes

In order to finance the Civil War, Congress authorizes the U.S. Department of the Treasury to issue non-interest-bearing Demand Notes. These notes earn the nickname “greenbacks” because of their color. All U.S. currency issued since 1861 remains valid and redeemable at full face value.

1862

The Foundation of Modern Design

By 1862, the Demand Notes incorporate fine-line engraving, intricate geometric lathe work patterns, a U.S. Department of the Treasury seal, and engraved signatures to aid in counterfeit deterrence. To this day, U.S. currency continues to add features to deter counterfeiting.

1862

United States Notes

Congress authorizes a new class of currency, known as “United States notes,” or “Legal Tender notes.” These notes are characterized by a red seal and serial number. They continue to circulate until 1971.
 

1869

Centralized Printing of United States Notes

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing begins engraving and printing the faces and seals of U.S. banknotes. Before this, U.S. banknotes were produced by private banknote companies and then sent to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing for sealing, trimming, and cutting.

1889

Names Added to Portraits

Legislation mandates that all banknotes and other securities containing portraits include the name of the individual below the portrait. This is why you see names below the portraits on banknotes to this day.

1913

Federal Reserve Act

The Federal Reserve Act of 1913 establishes the Federal Reserve as the nation’s central bank and provides for a national banking system that is more responsive to the fluctuating financial needs of the country. The Federal Reserve Board issues new currency called Federal Reserve notes.

1929

Standardization of Design

The appearance of U.S. banknotes changes greatly in 1929. In an effort to lower manufacturing costs, all Federal Reserve notes are made about 30 percent smaller—measuring 6.14 x 2.61 inches, rather than 7.375 x 3.125 inches. In addition, standardized designs are instituted for each denomination, decreasing the number of designs in circulation and making it easier for the public to distinguish between genuine and counterfeit notes.

1957

"In God We Trust"

Following a 1955 law requiring “In God We Trust” on all currency, the motto first appears on banknotes on series 1957 $1 silver certificates, then on 1963 series Federal Reserve notes.

1971

United States Notes Discontinued

Because United States notes no longer served any function not already adequately met by Federal Reserve notes, their issuance was discontinued and, beginning in 1971, no new United States notes were placed into circulation.

$1 Note Life Cycle

Before a Federal Reserve note enters circulation, it must pass through four critical steps: design, order, production, and issuance.

2.17
Billion Notes
2018 FY Print Order
$12.1
Billion
2017 Value in Circulation
5.8
Years
Estimated Lifespan