Videos

Watch our videos to learn more about U.S. currency.

You’d Be Surprised: Special Features

Learn how the characteristics of this cast of five creatures are similar to the security and design features of U.S. currency. Created with youth audiences in mind, this animated video is great for classroom use.

You’d Be Surprised: The Journey

Learn how the migration of monarch butterflies is similar to the life cycle of U.S. currency. Created with youth audiences in mind, this animated video is great for classroom use.

How Does U.S. Currency Get Into Circulation?

Michael Lambert, associate director for the U.S. Currency Program at the Federal Reserve Board, discusses how U.S. currency gets into circulation.

Does the Fed Print Money?

Michael Lambert, associate director for the U.S. Currency Program at the Federal Reserve Board, discusses who prints U.S. currency.

How to Authenticate U.S. Currency

Understand the main security features common across all U.S. banknotes to help quickly, easily, and discreetly determine if a note is genuine.

"The Basics" on U.S. Currency

Get a brief overview of U.S. currency, including the denominations and series in circulation, as well as the design process.

How Can I Tell if the Redesigned $100 Note is Genuine?

Sonja Danburg, program manager for U.S. Currency Education at the Federal Reserve Board, discusses how to use security features to authenticate the redesigned $100 note.

How does the Federal Reserve Board determine how much money to order?

Michael Lambert, associate director for the U.S. Currency Program at the Federal Reserve Board, discusses how the annual order for new currency is determined.

What should I do if I suspect that I've received a counterfeit note?

Sonja Danburg, program manager for U.S. Currency Education at the Federal Reserve Board, talks about what you should do if you think you have received a counterfeit note.

Recent Changes in the Production of Federal Reserve notes

A recent change has occurred in the production process of Federal Reserve notes. In order to increase efficiency, the Treasury’s Bureau of Engraving and Printing is using equipment that allows Federal Reserve notes to be printed on larger sheets of paper. Find out more about the production changes and how they affect the $1 note in this video. For more information about this change, please visit the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.